Pastiche roleplaying: the system

A post by the Mixed GM got me thinking about what I'm trying to do with the FAR System and FAR Western -- in essence, what I've been doing is trying to mix RPG game styles that I like. But not simply as a pastiche. I could probably slap together Pastiche: The System and have... Continue Reading →

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State of the FAR System

With warmer weather, fragrant blossoms, and new leaves, this seems like a good time to assess the state of the FAR System and what's next. First, a bit of new news: We're on RPGnow.com and drivethrurpg.com as Two Far Publishing. Nothing uploaded yet, but I'm working on a gaming aid that will probably go up... Continue Reading →

Friction checks: A way to add realism and excitement to your game

It's like the fog of war—but different. Where the fog of war usually refers generally to battlefield confusion, the concept of friction goes a step farther, quantifying the natural unpredictability of human reactions to threat, surprise, and stress. People who study human performance in combat have found that a predictable percentage of people—even trained soldiers—will fail... Continue Reading →

Making a movie in your head: The role of reality in roleplaying

For the most part, roleplaying games seek to model movies, not reality. I came across this idea in a short-lived gaming zine from the turn of the new century, and it really got me thinking about the nature of roleplaying games and why they're built the way they are. More specifically, why I'm building this... Continue Reading →

Old West prescription shades

Did you know that people in the Old West actually wore sunglasses? It was a surprise to me. I've been thinking about guns, horses, clothes, provisions, even eyeglasses...but sunglasses never occurred to me. While doing research on the Allen Pepperbox gun, I stumbled across a dramatic part the gun played in early Mormon history and... Continue Reading →

Christmas at the sawmill – A true story of the Old West

The growing settlements in the mountain valleys of Utah needed lumber, and it was Benjamin Franklin Johnson's job to provide it. More than a job -- a mission. The Mormon church's Council of the Twelve had asked him to do it, so he regarded the task as a sacred duty. The sawmill had been sited... Continue Reading →

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